Comparison of All-Porcelain vs. Porcelain Fused to Metal Crowns

A dental crown is a tooth-shaped "cap" that is placed over a tooth - to cover the tooth to restore its shape and size, strength, and improve its appearance. Permanent crown can be made from porcelain-fused-to-metal, or all porcelain.

All-Porcelain Porcelain Fused to
Metal
General Description Porcelain, ceramic or glasslike fillings and crowns
Porcelain is fused to an underlying metal structure to provide strength to a crown or bridge
Principal Uses Inlays, onlays, crowns and aesthetic veneers
Crowns and fixed bridges
Durability

Very strong and durable

Very strong and durable
Preparation Consideration Strength depends on adequate porcelain thickness; it requires moderate tooth reduction during preparation
Including both porcelain and metal creates a stronger restoration than porcelain alone; moderately aggressive tooth reduction is required
Resistance to Wear Highly resistant to wear, but porcelain can rapidly wear opposing teeth if its surface becomes rough
Highly resistant to wear, but porcelain can rapidly wear opposing teeth if its surface becomes rough
Resistance to Fracture Prone to fracture when placed under tension or on impact Porcelain is prone to impact fracture; the metal has high strength
Biocompatibility Well tolerated Well tolerated, but some patients may show allergenic sensitivity to base metals
Post-Placement Sensitivity Low thermal conductivity reduces the likelihood of discomfort from hot and cold High thermal conductivity may result in early post-placement discomfort from hot and cold
Esthetics Color and translucency mimic natural tooth appearance Porcelain can mimic natural tooth appearance, but metal limits translucency.
Relative Cost/Visits higher; requires at least two office visits and laboratory services Requires at least two office visits and laboratory services
Request contact Request a quote